beyond the self conversations between buddhism and neuroscience pdf

Beyond The Self Conversations Between Buddhism And Neuroscience Pdf

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Beyond the Self: Conversations between Buddhism and Neuroscience

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Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Beyond the Self by Matthieu Ricard.

Wolf Singer. Converging and diverging views on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, perception, meditation, and other topics. Buddhism shares with science the task of examining the mind empirically; it has pursued, for two millennia, direct investigation of the mind through penetrating introspection. Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowl Converging and diverging views on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, perception, meditation, and other topics.

Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowledge in the form of scientific observation. In this book, Matthieu Ricard, a Buddhist monk trained as a molecular biologist, and Wolf Singer, a distinguished neuroscientist—close friends, continuing an ongoing dialogue—offer their perspectives on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, epistemology, meditation, and neuroplasticity. Ricard and Singer's wide-ranging conversation stages an enlightening and engaging encounter between Buddhism's wealth of experiential findings and neuroscience's abundance of experimental results.

They discuss, among many other things, the difference between rumination and meditation rumination is the scourge of meditation, but psychotherapy depends on it ; the distinction between pure awareness and its contents; the Buddhist idea or lack of one of the unconscious and neuroscience's precise criteria for conscious and unconscious processes; and the commonalities between cognitive behavioral therapy and meditation.

Their views diverge Ricard asserts that the third-person approach will never encounter consciousness as a primary experience and converge Singer points out that the neuroscientific understanding of perception as reconstruction is very like the Buddhist all-discriminating wisdom but both keep their vision trained on understanding fundamental aspects of human life. Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages. More Details Other Editions Friend Reviews.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Beyond the Self , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Feb 18, David Dinaburg rated it it was amazing. The book looks bad. It exudes a self-help vibe. Its cover is not designed to draw the eye; not any eye I know, though perhaps someone, somewhere finds two seated upper torsos appealing. The title is boilerplate—in English translation, anyway—that churns into nothingness under the frothing weight of modern search engines.

It avoids my subtitle pet peeve of pomposity by being incredibly blunt: Conversations between Buddhism and Neuroscience is exactly what you get.

The entire book is constructed f The book looks bad. This is not an end-of-the-day-commute-home read, or a weekend-indoors-when-videogames-exist type of book. It is a deliberate choose-to-wake-up-early-and-go-to-the-coffee-shop-for-an-hour-before-work commitment, and in that hour you might check your phone a dozen times or, if the stars align and your mind is ripe, you may immerse yourself in a dozen pages of a neuroscientist and a Buddhist monk talking to each other.

Did I mention the monk has a phD in molecular genetics? They are both very, very smart: Matthieu Ricard :To come back to inner conflicts, they are mostly linked with excessive rumination on the past and anxious anticipation of the future, and thus they lead to being tormented by fear and hope.

Wolf Singer : I see it as an exaggeration of the otherwise well-adapted and necessary attempt to use part experience to predict the future, an attempt that is likely to not always converge toward a stable solution because the future is not foreseeable. Maybe it is the clinging to the fruitless search for the best possible solution—that is by definition impossible to find—that frustrates the system and causes uneasy feelings.

The whole experience of reading Beyond the Self felt a lot like running used to, or yoga does now; I got nervous before I actually started, but while I was doing it I was fully content. It defies summation or encapsulation in the way that lyrics without music seem silly unless you already know the beat.

My major takeaway was the worthwhile practice of remembering the brain and the self are not static; no one is who they were before or who they will be in the future. The mind, like the body, requires continuous work to stay in the shape or form you want it to be in: M : The crow often attack [the eagle], even though they are much smaller. They dive at the eagles from above trying to hit them with their beaks.

However, instead of getting alarmed and moving around to avoid the crow, the eagle simply retracts one wing at the last moment, letting the diving crow pass by, and extends its wing back out. The whole thing requires minimal effort and is perfectly efficient. Being experienced in dealing with the sudden arising of emotions in the mind works in a similar way.

W : That reminds me of what we do when we encounter severe difficulties that require fast solutions, such as a complicated traffic situation. We immediately call on a large repertoire of escape strategies that we have learned and practiced, and then we choose among them without much reasoning, relying mainly on subconscious heuristics. I very much appreciate this book and—awkward cover and bland title notwithstanding—wholeheartedly recommend everything about it.

Carve yourself off a month or two and look into what it is that makes a mind a person. Sep 13, Nicholas Valente rated it it was amazing. This one took me some time to get through. The subject matter of the book is difficult to describe due to limitations in language and the shear breadth of fields that are necessary to truly grasp the conclusions they attempt to reach.

Fields such as physics, mediation, religion, neuroscience, and more are all covered. The good news is that a reader does not need an in depth understanding of all of these in order to read this book but it wouldn't hurt. As described below this book is a long for This one took me some time to get through. By design or not, I think this is an effective way to dissect and understand this book.

I read it and then discussed with a family member. I felt the book raised more questions than it answers, which made discussing it with another reader all the more useful. I often struggle with the decision to read more or meditate more, but for me, reading this book has had lasting effects similar to mediation. I have a sense of more attention to my awareness and to my identity not being defined by my emotions.

This was a great read that truly changed the way I think and interact with others. I picked this book up randomly in the new release section of my library.

It was mostly a good balance of both the third-person scientific perspective of the neuroscientist Wolf Singer and the first-person contemplative experience of the monk Matthieu Ricard. I would have liked less Singer and more Ricard, as the science writing is a bit dry.

Singer had me rolling my eyes a fair bit in the way he tried to scientifically mansplain complex subjective experiences. But the way Ricard followed up was I picked this book up randomly in the new release section of my library. But the way Ricard followed up was always extremely on point, which had me wondering if a bit of it was just Singer playing devils advocate.

I have no doubt that Wolf Singer is an ally and much of the work that I see coming out of the Max Planck Institute is inspiring. Singer comes off as a bit of a behaviorist at times but Ricard was so chill and well considered in his responses that it made me want to read more of his work.

Cuenta con numerosas referencias al chileno Francisco Varela, amigo tanto de Ricard como de Singer y del Dalia Lama, todo un honor tener a este fallecido compatriota entre estos nombres. Mar 20, Barry rated it it was amazing. I've been looking for a book like this for awhile now. An integrative approach to meditation. The book is formatted as a long form interview between a neuroscientist and an experienced meditation practitioner who also has a background in science. The book follows a bit of a pattern, with Wolf the neuroscience expert dominating the conversation and Matthieu giving his response.

While Wolf's contributions can be a bit difficult to process- it's neuroscience, Matthieu's complements them with p I've been looking for a book like this for awhile now. While Wolf's contributions can be a bit difficult to process- it's neuroscience, Matthieu's complements them with paraphrases for the layman, and suggestions for application of the science to the practice. The conversation's tone is amicable and open minded, but at times the two are at odds.

Many topics don't lead to a resolution, but offer much useful insight on the topic. I ended up writing 5 pages of notes filled with paraphrases of the main ideas, and thought provoking questions that were raised as a result of the dialogue. If you are a practicing mediator, the conversation can add motivation and perspective to keep your practice fresh.

If you are not, it's quite possible that this would convince you to start. There are countless accounts of the benefits of meditation and no shortage of advocates, but perhaps being enlightened to the science behind it all may be the vehicle to finally convince those who are on the fence. It's important that material like this is spread, because as the book highlights, meditation benefits not just the individual, but more importantly society as a whole. Jun 25, Zachary Flessert rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction-science , buddhism.

I was referred to this book from an excerpt in The Atlantic. It peaked my interest for a few reasons, the primary reason being that it is an academic conversation about the details of the agreements and disagreements between Buddhist and neuroscientific philosophies.

It delves into both epistemology considerably and ontology.

Beyond the Self

Matthieu Ricard grew up among the personalities and ideas of French intellectual circles. He received a PhD degree in molecular genetics from the Pasteur Institute in He then decided to forsake his scientific career and instead practice Tibetan Buddhism , living mainly in the Himalayas. Ricard is a board member of the Mind and Life Institute. He received the French National Order of Merit for his humanitarian work in the East with Karuna-Shechen , the non-profit organization he co-founded in with Rabjam Rinpoche. Since , he has acted as the French interpreter for the 14th Dalai Lama.

Chris Impey does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. These are trying times. A global recession sparked by the coronavirus pandemic, and widespread civil unrest, have created a combustible mix of angst — stressors that heighten the risk for long-term health woes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued guidelines to cope with this anxiety. Among them is meditation. Buddhists have been familiar with this strategy for thousands of years.


Matthieu Ricard and Wolf Singer's Beyond the Self: Conversations between Buddhism and Neuroscience. Review by Paul J. Zak, Ph.D. Editor's Note: Buddhism.


Full E-book Beyond the Self: Conversations Between Buddhism and Neuroscience Complete

Buddhism shares with science the task of examining the mind empirically; it has pursued, for two millennia, direct investigation of the mind through penetrating introspection. Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowledge in the form of scientific observation. In this book, Matthieu Ricard, a Buddhist monk trained as a molecular biologist, and Wolf Singer, a distinguished neuroscientist -- close friends, continuing an ongoing dialogue -- offer their perspectives on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, epistemology, meditation, and neuroplasticity. Ricard and Singer's wide-ranging conversation stages an enlightening and engaging encounter between Buddhism's wealth of experiential findings and neuroscience's abundance of experimental results. They discuss, among many other things, the difference between rumination and meditation rumination is the scourge of meditation, but psychotherapy depends on it ; the distinction between pure awareness and its contents; the Buddhist idea or lack of one of the unconscious and neuroscience's precise criteria for conscious and unconscious processes; and the commonalities between cognitive behavioral therapy and meditation.

Either your web browser doesn't support Javascript or it is currently turned off. In the latter case, please turn on Javascript support in your web browser and reload this page. Buddhism shares with science the task of examining the mind empirically. But Buddhism has pursued, for two millennia, direct investigation of the mind through penetrating introspection. Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowledge in the form of scientific observation.

Beyond the Self: Conversations between Buddhism and Neuroscience

Du kanske gillar. Altruism Matthieu Ricard E-bok. Ladda ned. Spara som favorit.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book.

By Matthieu Ricard and Wolf Singer. Converging and diverging views on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, perception, meditation, and other topics. Buddhism shares with science the task of examining the mind empirically; it has pursued, for two millennia, direct investigation of the mind through penetrating introspection. Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowledge in the form of scientific observation. In this book, Matthieu Ricard, a Buddhist monk trained as a molecular biologist, and Wolf Singer, a distinguished neuroscientist—close friends, continuing an ongoing dialogue—offer their perspectives on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, epistemology, meditation, and neuroplasticity. Ricard and Singer's wide-ranging conversation stages an enlightening and engaging encounter between Buddhism's wealth of experiential findings and neuroscience's abundance of experimental results. They discuss, among many other things, the difference between rumination and meditation rumination is the scourge of meditation, but psychotherapy depends on it ; the distinction between pure awareness and its contents; the Buddhist idea or lack of one of the unconscious and neuroscience's precise criteria for conscious and unconscious processes; and the commonalities between cognitive behavioral therapy and meditation.

Matthieu Ricard, a Buddhist monk, trained as a molecular biologist before moving to Nepal to study Buddhism. Converging and diverging views on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, perception, meditation, and other topics. Buddhism shares with science the task of examining the mind empirically; it has pursued, for two millennia, direct investigation of the mind through penetrating introspection. Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowledge in the form of scientific observation. In this book, Matthieu Ricard, a Buddhist monk trained as a molecular biologist, and Wolf Singer, a distinguished neuroscientist—close friends, continuing an ongoing dialogue—offer their perspectives on the mind, the self, consciousness, the unconscious, free will, epistemology, meditation, and neuroplasticity.

Buddhism shares with science the task of examining the mind empirically. But Buddhism has pursued, for two millennia, direct investigation of the mind through penetrating introspection. Neuroscience, on the other hand, relies on third-person knowledge in the form of scientific observation.

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